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Wolf-dog hybrids

Position Statement
CFHS is opposed to the keeping and breeding of wolf-dog hybrids.

Definition of a Wolf-dog Hybrid
A wolf-dog hybrid is an animal produced by breeding a domestic dog to a wolf or the subsequent breeding of these wolf-dog hybrids either to domestic dogs or to other wolf-dog hybrids. This includes any animal that is advertised, registered or otherwise described or presented as a wolf-dog hybrid by the owner.

Definition of a Domesticated Dog
A domesticated dog is one which tends to possess reliability of temperament, tractability, docility, predictability and trainability and which has adapted to life in intimate with humans. Animals achieve domesticated status through many generations of selective breeding for preferred attributes.

Background/Rationale
CFHS believes that wolf-dog hybrids:

  • cannot be successfully and safely integrated into a human environment because they must be confined at all times. This confinement does not meet the physical, social and psychological needs of the animal.
  • pose a threat to native wolf populations by diluting the gene pool, and the potential for introducing diseases and defects not currently found in the wild.
  • are not domesticated animals and as a result, can be dangerously unpredictable. They cannot be trusted with people, especially children, or other animals whose actions may trigger the predatory instincts of the wolf hybrid often with tragic consequences for all involved. Such behaviour in the wolf hybrid is genetically encoded and cannot be eliminated by socialization and training.

CFHS acknowledges that some wolf hybrids are kept as pets. In those cases CFHS recommends that they be permitted to live out their lives provided that:

  • they are kept in suitable conditions that, to the extent possible, meet the animals’ physical, social and psychological needs.
  • they are spayed or neutered and permanently identified with a microchip implant.
  • they receive proper veterinary care at all times, including preventive.
  • if they are presented to a humane society or animal control agency it is recommended that they not be placed elsewhere.

May 1996

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