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Hunting

Click on the links below for more information on hunting and the CFHSs’ related concerns:

International trade in wildlife parts

CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) & International Trade in Wildlife Parts The international trade in wildlife, including live species and plant and animal products, is worth billions of dollars and includes trade in millions of species. In the 1960s people became concerned that as the wildlife trade increased, plants and animals would ...

Remote control hunting

In 2003, while looking at a deer through a webcam, a Texas man came up with the idea of remote control hunting. His idea was to set up a rifle in a blind on his ranch, which could be controlled by the click of a mouse from a computer miles away. John Lockwood worked quickly to put his plan into action, developing his Live-Shot.com website – which was removed from the web after Texas banned ...

Illegal hunting and black market trading in wildlife parts

The second biggest threat to wildlife around the world – after habitat destruction – is hunting. Canada has several laws in place to protect its wide variety of animals but illegal hunting for the trade in wildlife and wildlife parts is still growing, jeopardizing threatened and endangered species. As wildlife populations are depleted in other countries, poachers are turning to Canada to ...

Spring bear hunt

Ontario’s spring bear hunt has been a controversial subject for many years. In 1999 Mike Harris’s Progressive Conservative government banned the spring hunt that had existed in the province for decades. Before the ban was introduced, thousands of black bears were killed each year during the spring hunt. Many Americans would come up to Ontario for the hunt because it has been outlawed in most ...

Penned hunting

Penned hunting is the practice of shooting an animal in an enclosure for a trophy and it is banned in every province except Quebec and Saskatchewan. Clients – often elderly, disabled, or new hunters – pay a fee to shoot an animal of their choice. Many hunters who are inexperienced or unable to hunt in the wild go to game farms because a trophy is pretty much guaranteed. The animals, both ...

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