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Trapping

Click on the links below for more information on trapping and the CFHS’s concerns:

What is trapping?

Related For more information about trapping standards, click on the links below: Agreement for International Humane Trapping Standards* Trapping for has decreased since the 1970s but there are still approximately 60,000 fur trappers in Canada, most of them trapping part time. Fur trapping has become increasingly regulated in Canada. The practice falls under the ...

Trapping standards

Related For more information about trapping standards, click on the links below: Agreement for International Humane Trapping Standards Fur Institute of Canada In 1995 the European Union banned the importation of wild fur products from countries using jaw-type leghold traps. Since the EU was one of the biggest importers of Canadian fur products, Canada worked quickly to have ...

Types of traps

The traps used in the fur industry have evolved over time to include more sophisticated and usually more humane traps for furbearing animals, and recently to meet international humane trapping standards. Today there are three main categories of traps used in the fur industry: killing traps, restraining traps, and drowning sets. Killing traps are designed to instantly or quickly kill a ...

Urban trapping

With urban expansion, many animals lose their natural habitats and find a new way of life in the city. Animals are quick to adapt to a new habitat and can easily find shelter in garages, sheds, chimneys, and in other easily accessible places that make good nesting places and even resemble the hollow trees and caves that naturally house these animals. In addition to these available shelters, ...

Fur

Related For more information on animals trapped and hunted for fur, see our Trapping or Hunting sections. For more information about trapping standards, click on the links below: Agreement for International Humane Trapping Standards Fur Institute of Canada Every year over one million animals are trapped in Canada for their fur. The fur trade was one of Canada’s earliest ...

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